SODIUM BICARBONATE

Chemwatch Independent Material Safety Data Sheet

Issue Date: 14-Sep-2010

NC317TCP

CHEMWATCH 10448

Version No:8

Section 1 - CHEMICAL PRODUCT AND COMPANY IDENTIFICATION

PRODUCT NAME

SODIUM BICARBONATE

PRODUCT USE

Manufacture of many sodium salts; source of carbon dioxide; component of dry powder fire extinguishers, and also Soda-Acid extinguishers. Food additive 500; ingredient of baking powder, effervescent salines and beverages. A mild alkali, used medicinally in low doses in antacid mixes. Also available as an intravenous infusion.
Available as Technical, Pure, Food and BP grades.

SUPPLIER

Company: Orica Company: Merck Pty Ltd
AUS Emergency Tel: +1800 033 111 (All Hours) AUS Emergency Tel: +61 3 9728 7600
Email: admin@merck.com.au
Company: IMCD Ltd Website: http://203.221.251.46/msds/msds.aspx
AUS Telephone: +61 3 8544 3100
Website: http://www.imcd.com.au Company: Biotech Pharmaceuticals Pty Ltd
AUS Telephone: +61 3 9278 7555
Company: AMC Email: info@biotechpharma.com.au
AUS Emergency Tel: +61 400 966 951
Company: Sun Ace Australia Pty Ltd
Company: Tuff Drilling Solutions Pty Ltd AUS Emergency Tel: 0408 033 935
AUS Emergency Tel: 1800 039 008 (24 hrs)
Email: sales@tuffmud.com Company: Sud- Chemie Pty Ltd
AUS Emergency Tel: +61 2 47 321 421 Business Hours
Company: Penrice Soda Products Email: sales@sued- chemie.com.au
AUS Telephone: +61 8 8402 7245 Website: www.sued- chem.com

Section 2 - HAZARDS IDENTIFICATION

STATEMENT OF HAZARDOUS NATURE

NON-HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCE. NON-DANGEROUS GOODS. According to NOHSC Criteria, and ADG Code.

CHEMWATCH HAZARD RATINGS

Flammability 0
Toxicity 0
Body Contact 2
Reactivity 1
Chronic 0
SCALE: Min/Nil=0 Low=1 Moderate=2 High=3 Extreme=4

 

RISK SAFETY
■ May produce discomfort of the eyes and skin*. • Avoid contact with skin.
* (limited evidence). • Avoid contact with eyes.
• Wear suitable gloves.
• Wear eye/ face protection.
• In case of contact with eyes, rinse with plenty of water and contact Doctor or Poisons Information Centre.

 

Section 3 - COMPOSITION / INFORMATION ON INGREDIENTS

NAME CAS RN %
sodium bicarbonate 144-55-8 >99

Section 4 - FIRST AID MEASURES

SWALLOWED

· Immediately give a glass of water.
· First aid is not generally required. If in doubt, contact a Poisons Information Centre or a doctor.

EYE

■ If this product comes in contact with the eyes:
· Wash out immediately with fresh running water.
· Ensure complete irrigation of the eye by keeping eyelids apart and away from eye and moving the eyelids by occasionally lifting the upper and lower lids.
· Seek medical attention without delay; if pain persists or recurs seek medical attention.
· Removal of contact lenses after an eye injury should only be undertaken by skilled personnel.

SKIN

■ If skin contact occurs:
· Immediately remove all contaminated clothing, including footwear.
· Flush skin and hair with running water (and soap if available).
· Seek medical attention in event of irritation.

INHALED

· If dust is inhaled, remove from contaminated area.
· Encourage patient to blow nose to ensure clear passage of breathing.
· If irritation or discomfort persists seek medical attention.

NOTES TO PHYSICIAN

■ Treat symptomatically.

Section 5 - FIRE FIGHTING MEASURES

EXTINGUISHING MEDIA

· There is no restriction on the type of extinguisher which may be used.
· Use extinguishing media suitable for surrounding area.

FIRE FIGHTING

· Alert Fire Brigade and tell them location and nature of hazard.
· Wear breathing apparatus plus protective gloves for fire only.
· Prevent, by any means available, spillage from entering drains or water courses.
· Use fire fighting procedures suitable for surrounding area.
· DO NOT approach containers suspected to be hot.
· Cool fire exposed containers with water spray from a protected location.
· If safe to do so, remove containers from path of fire.
· Equipment should be thoroughly decontaminated after use.

FIRE/EXPLOSION HAZARD

· Non combustible.
· Not considered a significant fire risk, however containers may burn.
Heating may cause expansion or decomposition leading to violent rupture of containers.
Decomposes on heating and produces toxic fumes of: carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2).

FIRE INCOMPATIBILITY

· Avoid contamination with oxidising agents i.e. nitrates, oxidising acids, chlorine bleaches, pool chlorine etc. as ignition may result.

HAZCHEM

None

Personal Protective Equipment

Gloves, boots (chemical resistant).

Section 6 - ACCIDENTAL RELEASE MEASURES

MINOR SPILLS

■ Slippery when spilt.
· Clean up all spills immediately.
· Avoid breathing dust and contact with skin and eyes.
· Wear protective clothing, gloves, safety glasses and dust respirator.
· Use dry clean up procedures and avoid generating dust.
· Sweep up, shovel up or
· Vacuum up (consider explosion- proof machines designed to be grounded during storage and use).
· Place spilled material in clean, dry, sealable, labelled container.

MAJOR SPILLS

■ Slippery when spilt.
· Clear area of personnel and move upwind.
· Alert Fire Brigade and tell them location and nature of hazard.
· Control personal contact by using protective equipment and dust respirator.
· Prevent spillage from entering drains, sewers or water courses.
· Recover product wherever possible. Avoid generating dust.
· Sweep / shovel up.
· If required, wet with water to prevent dusting.
· Put residues in labelled plastic bags or other containers for disposal.
· Wash area down with large quantity of water and prevent runoff into drains.
· If contamination of drains or waterways occurs, advise emergency services.

 

Personal Protective Equipment advice is contained in Section 8 of the MSDS.

Section 7 - HANDLING AND STORAGE

PROCEDURE FOR HANDLING

· Limit all unnecessary personal contact.
· Wear protective clothing when risk of exposure occurs.
· Use in a well-ventilated area.
· When handling DO NOT eat, drink or smoke.
· Always wash hands with soap and water after handling.
· Avoid physical damage to containers.
· Use good occupational work practice.
· Observe manufacturer's storing and handling recommendations.

SUITABLE CONTAINER

· Lined metal can, lined metal pail/ can.
· Plastic pail.
· Polyliner drum.
· Packing as recommended by manufacturer.
· Check all containers are clearly labelled and free from leaks.
· Glass container is suitable for laboratory quantities.

STORAGE INCOMPATIBILITY

· Avoid strong acids, acid chlorides, acid anhydrides and chloroformates.
· Avoid reaction with oxidising agents.
Segregate from monoammonium phosphate, acids and strong oxidisers. Reacts rapidly with acidic materials, generates carbon dioxide gas, which may pressurise, even violently rupture containers.

PACKAGING MATERIAL INCOMPATIBILITIES

Chemical Name                   Container Type
Sodium Bicarbonate              Aluminum, Brass

STORAGE REQUIREMENTS

· Store in original containers.
· Keep containers securely sealed.
· Store in a cool, dry, well-ventilated area.
· Store away from incompatible materials and foodstuff containers.
· Protect containers against physical damage and check regularly for leaks.
· Observe manufacturer's storing and handling recommendations.

_____________________________________________________

SAFE STORAGE WITH OTHER CLASSIFIED CHEMICALS

+ + + + X +

_____________________________________________________

+: May be stored together
O: May be stored together with specific preventions
X: Must not be stored together

 

Section 8 - EXPOSURE CONTROLS / PERSONAL PROTECTION

EXPOSURE CONTROLS

• sodium bicarbonate: CAS:144-55-8

 

MATERIAL DATA

SODIUM BICARBONATE:
■ Sensory irritants are chemicals that produce temporary and undesirable side- effects on the eyes, nose or throat. Historically occupational exposure standards for
these irritants have been based on observation of workers' responses to various airborne concentrations. Present day expectations require that nearly every
individual should be protected against even minor sensory irritation and exposure standards are established using uncertainty factors or safety factors of 5 to 10 or
more. On occasion animal no- observable- effect- levels (NOEL) are used to determine these limits where human results are unavailable. An additional approach,
typically used by the TLV committee (USA) in determining respiratory standards for this group of chemicals, has been to assign ceiling values (TLV C) to rapidly
acting irritants and to assign short- term exposure limits (TLV STELs) when the weight of evidence from irritation, bioaccumulation and other endpoints combine to
warrant such a limit. In contrast the MAK Commission (Germany) uses a five- category system based on intensive odour, local irritation, and elimination half- life.
However this system is being replaced to be consistent with the European Union (EU) Scientific Committee for Occupational Exposure Limits (SCOEL); this is more
closely allied to that of the USA.
OSHA (USA) concluded that exposure to sensory irritants can:
· cause inflammation
· cause increased susceptibility to other irritants and infectious agents
· lead to permanent injury or dysfunction
· permit greater absorption of hazardous substances and
· acclimate the worker to the irritant warning properties of these substances thus increasing the risk of overexposure.
It is the goal of the ACGIH (and other Agencies) to recommend TLVs (or their equivalent) for all substances for which there is evidence of health effects at airborne
concentrations encountered in the workplace.
At this time no TLV has been established, even though this material may produce adverse health effects (as evidenced in animal experiments or clinical experience).
Airborne concentrations must be maintained as low as is practically possible and occupational exposure must be kept to a minimum.
NOTE: The ACGIH occupational exposure standard for Particles Not Otherwise Specified (P.N.O.S) does NOT apply.

 

PERSONAL PROTECTION

EYE

· Safety glasses with side shields.
· Chemical goggles.
· Contact lenses may pose a special hazard; soft contact lenses may absorb and concentrate irritants. A written policy document, describing the wearing of lens or
restrictions on use, should be created for each workplace or task. This should include a review of lens absorption and adsorption for the class of chemicals in use
and an account of injury experience. Medical and first- aid personnel should be trained in their removal and suitable equipment should be readily available. In the
event of chemical exposure, begin eye irrigation immediately and remove contact lens as soon as practicable. Lens should be removed at the first signs of eye redness
or irritation - lens should be removed in a clean environment only after workers have washed hands thoroughly. [CDC NIOSH Current Intelligence Bulletin 59], [AS/NZS
1336 or national equivalent].

HANDS/FEET

■ Suitability and durability of glove type is dependent on usage. Important factors in the selection of gloves include:
· frequency and duration of contact,
· chemical resistance of glove material,
· glove thickness and
· dexterity
Select gloves tested to a relevant standard (e.g. Europe EN 374, US F739, AS/NZS 2161.1 or national equivalent).
· When prolonged or frequently repeated contact may occur, a glove with a protection class of 5 or higher (breakthrough time greater than 240 minutes according to EN
374, AS/NZS 2161.10.1 or national equivalent) is recommended.
· When only brief contact is expected, a glove with a protection class of 3 or higher (breakthrough time greater than 60 minutes according to EN 374, AS/NZS
2161.10.1 or national equivalent) is recommended.
· Contaminated gloves should be replaced.
Gloves must only be worn on clean hands. After using gloves, hands should be washed and dried thoroughly. Application of a non- perfumed moisturiser is recommended.
Experience indicates that the following polymers are suitable as glove materials for protection against undissolved, dry solids, where abrasive particles are not
present.
· polychloroprene
· nitrile rubber
· butyl rubber
· fluorocaoutchouc
· polyvinyl chloride
Gloves should be examined for wear and/ or degradation constantly.

OTHER

· Overalls.
· P.V.C. apron.
· Barrier cream.
· Skin cleansing cream.
· Eye wash unit.

RESPIRATOR

•Particulate. (AS/NZS 1716 & 1715, EN 143:2000 & 149:2001, ANSI Z88 or national equivalent)
· Respirators may be necessary when engineering and administrative controls do not adequately prevent exposures.
· The decision to use respiratory protection should be based on professional judgment that takes into account toxicity information, exposure measurement data, and
frequency and likelihood of the worker' s exposure - ensure users are not subject to high thermal loads which may result in heat stress or distress due to personal
protective equipment (powered, positive flow, full face apparatus may be an option).
· Published occupational exposure limits, where they exist, will assist in determining the adequacy of the selected respiratory . These may be government mandated or
vendor recommended.
· Certified respirators will be useful for protecting workers from inhalation of particulates when properly selected and fit tested as part of a complete respiratory
protection program.
· Use approved positive flow mask if significant quantities of dust becomes airborne.
· Try to avoid creating dust conditions.
The local concentration of material, quantity and conditions of use determine the type of personal protective equipment required. For further information consult
site specific CHEMWATCH data (if available), or your Occupational Health and Safety Advisor.

ENGINEERING CONTROLS

■ Engineering controls are used to remove a hazard or place a barrier between the worker and the hazard. Well- designed engineering controls can be highly effective
in protecting workers and will typically be independent of worker interactions to provide this high level of protection.
The basic types of engineering controls are:
Process controls which involve changing the way a job activity or process is done to reduce the risk.
Enclosure and/or isolation of emission source which keeps a selected hazard " physically" away from the worker and ventilation that strategically " adds" and "
removes" air in the work environment. Ventilation can remove or dilute an air contaminant if designed properly. The design of a ventilation system must match the
particular process and chemical or contaminant in use.
Employers may need to use multiple types of controls to prevent employee overexposure.
General exhaust is adequate under normal operating conditions. If risk of overexposure exists, wear SAA approved respirator. Correct fit is essential to obtain
adequate protection. Provide adequate ventilation in warehouse or closed storage areas. Air contaminants generated in the workplace possess varying " escape"
velocities which, in turn, determine the " capture velocities" of fresh circulating air required to effectively remove the contaminant.
Type of Contaminant: Air Speed:
solvent, vapours, degreasing etc., evaporating from tank (in still air) 0.25-0.5 m/s (50-100 f/min)
aerosols, fumes from pouring operations, intermittent container filling, low speed conveyer transfers, welding, spray drift, plating acid fumes, pickling (released at low velocity into zone of active generation) 0.5-1 m/s (100-200 f/min.)
direct spray, spray painting in shallow booths, drum filling, conveyer loading, crusher dusts, gas discharge (active generation into zone of rapid air motion) 1-2.5 m/s (200-500 f/min)
grinding, abrasive blasting, tumbling, high speed wheel generated dusts (released at high initial velocity into zone of very high rapid air motion). 2.5-10 m/s (500-2000 f/min.)
Within each range the appropriate value depends on:
Lower end of the range Upper end of the range
1: Room air currents minimal or favourable to capture 1: Disturbing room air currents
2: Contaminants of low toxicity or of nuisance value only 2: Contaminants of high toxicity
3: Intermittent, low production. 3: High production, heavy use
4: Large hood or large air mass in motion 4: Small hood - local control only
Simple theory shows that air velocity falls rapidly with distance away from the opening of a simple extraction pipe. Velocity generally decreases with the square of distance from the extraction point (in simple cases). Therefore the air speed at the extraction point should be adjusted, accordingly, after reference to distance from the contaminating source. The air velocity at the extraction fan, for example, should be a minimum of 1- 2 m/s (200- 400 f/min.) for extraction of solvents generated in a tank 2 meters distant from the extraction point. Other mechanical considerations, producing performance deficits within the extraction apparatus, make it essential that theoretical air velocities are multiplied by factors of 10 or more when extraction systems are installed or used.

Section 9 - PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES

APPEARANCE

White, crystalline odourless powder or granules. Soluble in water. Begins to lose carbon dioxide at about 50 deg.C., and at 100 deg.C it is converted into sodium
carbonate. Insoluble in alcohol. Readily decomposed by weak acids. Slowly decomposes in moist air.

PHYSICAL PROPERTIES

Solid.
Mixes with water.

 

StateDivided solidMolecular Weight84.0
Melting Range (ºC)70 (decomposes)ViscosityNot Applicable
Boiling Range (ºC)Not applicable.Solubility in water (g/L)Miscible
Flash Point (ºC)Not applicablepH (1% solution)8.4
Decomposition Temp (ºC)270pH (as supplied)Not applicable
Autoignition Temp (ºC)Not applicableVapour Pressure (kPa)Not applicable.
Upper Explosive Limit (%)Not applicableSpecific Gravity (water=1)2.16
Lower Explosive Limit (%)Not applicableRelative Vapour Density (air=1)Not applicable.
Volatile Component (%vol)NilEvaporation RateNot applicable

 

StateDivided solidMolecular Weight84.0
Melting Range (ºC)70 (decomposes)ViscosityNot Applicable
Boiling Range (ºC)Not applicable.Solubility in water (g/L)Miscible
Flash Point (ºC)Not applicablepH (1% solution)8.4
Decomposition Temp (ºC)270pH (as supplied)Not applicable
Autoignition Temp (ºC)Not applicableVapour Pressure (kPa)Not applicable.
Upper Explosive Limit (%)Not applicableSpecific Gravity (water=1)2.16
Lower Explosive Limit (%)Not applicableRelative Vapour Density (air=1)Not applicable.
Volatile Component (%vol)NilEvaporation RateNot applicable

Section 10 - STABILITY AND REACTIVITY

CONDITIONS CONTRIBUTING TO INSTABILITY

· Presence of incompatible materials.
Product is considered stable and hazardous polymerisation will not occur.

For incompatible materials - refer to Section 7 - Handling and Storage.

Section 11 - TOXICOLOGICAL INFORMATION

POTENTIAL HEALTH EFFECTS

ACUTE HEALTH EFFECTS

SWALLOWED

■ Although ingestion is not thought to produce harmful effects (as classified under EC Directives), the material may still be damaging to the health of the
individual, following ingestion, especially where pre- existing organ (e.g. liver, kidney) damage is evident. Present definitions of harmful or toxic substances are
generally based on doses producing mortality rather than those producing morbidity (disease, ill- health). Gastrointestinal tract discomfort may produce nausea and
vomiting. In an occupational setting however, ingestion of insignificant quantities is not thought to be cause for concern.

EYE

■ Limited evidence or practical experience suggests, that the material may cause eye irritation in a substantial number of individuals. Prolonged eye contact may
cause inflammation characterised by a temporary redness of the conjunctiva (similar to windburn).

SKIN

■ Skin contact is not thought to have harmful health effects (as classified under EC Directives); the material may still produce health damage following entry
through wounds, lesions or abrasions.
There is some evidence to suggest that the material may cause mild but significant inflammation of the skin either following direct contact or after a delay of some
time. Repeated exposure can cause contact dermatitis which is characterised by redness, swelling and blistering.

INHALED

■ The material is not thought to produce adverse health effects or irritation of the respiratory tract (as classified by EC Directives using animal models).
Nevertheless, good hygiene practice requires that exposure be kept to a minimum and that suitable control measures be used in an occupational setting.
Persons with impaired respiratory function, airway diseases and conditions such as emphysema or chronic bronchitis, may incur further disability if excessive
concentrations of particulate are inhaled.
If prior damage to the circulatory or nervous systems has occurred or if kidney damage has been sustained, proper screenings should be conducted on individuals who
may be exposed to further risk if handling and use of the material result
in excessive exposures.

CHRONIC HEALTH EFFECTS

■ Long- term exposure to the product is not thought to produce chronic effects adverse to the health (as classified by EC Directives using animal models);
nevertheless exposure by all routes should be minimised as a matter of course.
Long term exposure to high dust concentrations may cause changes in lung function i.e. pneumoconiosis; caused by particles less than 0.5 micron penetrating and
remaining in the lung. Prime symptom is breathlessness; lung shadows show on X- ray.

TOXICITY AND IRRITATION

SODIUM BICARBONATE:
■ unless otherwise specified data extracted from RTECS - Register of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances.
TOXICITY IRRITATION
Oral (rat) LD50: 4220 mg/kg Eye (rabbit): 100 mg rinse - Mild
Oral (man) TDLo: 14432 mg/kg Skin (human): 30 mg/3d-I-Mild
■ The material may cause skin irritation after prolonged or repeated exposure and may produce on contact skin redness, swelling, the production of vesicles, scaling and thickening of the skin.

 

 

Section 12 - ECOLOGICAL INFORMATION

SODIUM BICARBONATE:

Ecotoxicity

IngredientPersistence: Water/SoilPersistence: AirBioaccumulationMobility
sodium bicarbonateLOWNo Data AvailableLOWHIGH

 

GESAMP/EHS COMPOSITE LIST - GESAMP Hazard Profiles

Name /     EHS  TRN  A1a  A1b  A1   A2   B1   B2   C1   C2   C3   D1   D2   D3   E1   E2   E3
Cas No /
RTECS No
_________  ___  ___  ___  ___  ___  ___  ___  ___  ___  ___  ___  ___  ___  ___  ___  ___  ___
Sodium     238  355  0         0    Ino  0    0    0    0    (0)  0    0              D    0
bicarbona  6    8                   rg
te
solution
(less
than 10%)
/
CAS:144-
55- 8 /


Legend:
EHS=EHS Number (EHS=GESAMP Working Group on the Evaluation of the Hazards of Harmful Substances Carried by Ships) NRT=Net Register Tonnage, A1a=Bioaccumulation log Pow, A1b=Bioaccumulation BCF, A1=Bioaccumulation, A2=Biodegradation, B1=Acuteaquatic toxicity LC/ECIC50 (mg/l), B2=Chronic aquatic toxicity NOEC (mg/l), C1=Acute mammalian oral toxicity LD50 (mg/kg), C2=Acutemammalian dermal toxicity LD50 (mg/kg), C3=Acute mammalian inhalation toxicity LC50 (mg/kg), D1=Skin irritation & corrosion, D2=Eye irritation& corrosion, D3=Long-term health effects, E1=Tainting, E2=Physical effects on wildlife & benthic habitats, E3=Interference with coastal amenities,
For column A2: R=Readily biodegradable, NR=Not readily biodegradable.
For column D3: C=Carcinogen, M=Mutagenic, R=Reprotoxic, S=Sensitising, A=Aspiration hazard, T=Target organ systemic toxicity, L=Lunginjury, N=Neurotoxic, I=Immunotoxic.
For column E1: NT=Not tainting (tested), T=Tainting test positive.
For column E2: Fp=Persistent floater, F=Floater, S=Sinking substances.
The numerical scales start from 0 (no hazard), while higher numbers reflect increasing hazard.
(GESAMP/EHS Composite List of Hazard Profiles - Hazard evaluation of substances transported by ships)

Section 13 - DISPOSAL CONSIDERATIONS

■ Legislation addressing waste disposal requirements may differ by country, state and/ or territory. Each user must refer to laws operating in their area. In some areas, certain wastes must be tracked.
A Hierarchy of Controls seems to be common - the user should investigate:
· Reduction
· Reuse
· Recycling
· Disposal (if all else fails)
This material may be recycled if unused, or if it has not been contaminated so as to make it unsuitable for its intended use. Shelf life considerations should also be applied in making decisions of this type. Note that properties of a material may change in use, and recycling or reuse may not always be appropriate.
· DO NOT allow wash water from cleaning or process equipment to enter drains.
· It may be necessary to collect all wash water for treatment before disposal.
· In all cases disposal to sewer may be subject to local laws and regulations and these should be considered first.
· Where in doubt contact the responsible authority.
· Recycle wherever possible.
· Consult manufacturer for recycling options or consult local or regional waste management authority for disposal if no suitable treatment or disposal facility can be identified.
· Dispose of by: burial in a land-fill specifically licenced to accept chemical and / or pharmaceutical wastes or Incineration in a licenced apparatus (after admixture with suitable combustible material)
· Decontaminate empty containers. Observe all label safeguards until containers are cleaned and destroyed.

Section 14 - TRANSPORTATION INFORMATION

HAZCHEM:

None (ADG7)
NOT REGULATED FOR TRANSPORT OF DANGEROUS GOODS: ADG7, UN, IATA, IMDG

 

GESAMP hazard profiles for this material can be found in section 12 of the MSDS.

Section 15 - REGULATORY INFORMATION

POISONS SCHEDULE None

REGULATIONS

sodium bicarbonate (CAS: 144-55-8) is found on the following regulatory lists;

"Australia High Volume Industrial Chemical List (HVICL)","Australia Inventory of Chemical Substances (AICS)","CODEX General Standard for Food Additives (GSFA) - Additives Permitted for Use in Food in General, Unless Otherwise Specified, in Accordance with GMP","GESAMP/EHS Composite List - GESAMP Hazard Profiles","IMO Provisional Categorization of Liquid Substances - List 1: Pure or technically pure products","International Council of Chemical Associations (ICCA) - High Production Volume List","International Fragrance Association (IFRA) Survey: Transparency List"

Section 16 - OTHER INFORMATION

CONTACT POINT

Paul Milward-Bason
17 Grandview Parade
Moolap 3221
Victoria Australia

 

MSDS SECTION CHANGES

The following table displays the version number of and date on which each section was last changed.

Section Name        Version  Date             Section Name        Version  Date             Section Name        Version  Date
First Aid (eye)     6        16- Aug- 2006    Storage (storage    7        9- Oct- 2008     Acute Health (eye)  6        16- Aug- 2006
                                              requirement)
First Aid           8        14- Sep- 2010    Storage (suitable   7        9- Oct- 2008     Acute Health        7        9- Oct- 2008
(inhaled)                                     container)                                    (inhaled)
First Aid (skin)    6        16- Aug- 2006    Engineering         8        14- Sep- 2010    Acute Health        7        9- Oct- 2008
                                              Control                                       (skin)
Fire Fighter (fire  6        16- Aug- 2006    Exposure Standard   7        9- Oct- 2008     Acute Health        6        16- Aug- 2006
fighting)                                                                                   (swallowed)
Fire Fighter (fire  6        16- Aug- 2006    Personal            6        16- Aug- 2006    Chronic Health      6        16- Aug- 2006
incompatibility)                              Protection (eye)
Fire Fighter        8        14- Sep- 2010    Personal            7        9- Oct- 2008     Toxicity and        8        14- Sep- 2010
(fire/explosion                               Protection                                    Irritation
hazard)                                       (hands/feet)                                  (Irritation)
Spills (major)      8        14- Sep- 2010    Personal            6        16- Aug- 2006    Toxicity and        8        14- Sep- 2010
                                              Protection (other)                            Irritation (Other)
Spills (minor)      8        14- Sep- 2010    Appearance          8        14- Sep- 2010    Toxicity and        6        16- Aug- 2006
                                                                                            Irritation
                                                                                            (Toxicity Figure)
Handling Procedure  8        14- Sep- 2010    Physical            6        16- Aug- 2006    Disposal            7        9- Oct- 2008
                                              Properties
Storage (storage    6        16- Aug- 2006    Instability         6        16- Aug- 2006
incompatibility)                              Condition

 

■ Classification of the preparation and its individual components has drawn on official and authoritative sources as well as independent review by the Chemwatch Classification committee using available literature references.
A list of reference resources used to assist the committee may be found at:
www.chemwatch.net/references.

 

■ The (M)SDS is a Hazard Communication tool and should be used to assist in the Risk Assessment. Many factors determine whether the reported Hazards are Risks in the workplace or other settings. Risks may be determined by reference to Exposures Scenarios. Scale of use, frequency of use and current or available engineering controls must be considered.

 

 

This document is copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purposes of private study, research, review or
criticism, as permitted under the Copyright Act, no part may be reproduced by any process without written
permission from CHEMWATCH. TEL (+61 3) 9572 4700.

 

Issue Date: 14-Sep-2010

Print Date: 17-Feb-2012

 

 

This is the end of the MSDS.